Category Archives: Regulations

Welcome Back, Paul Ryan


Bloomberg – It’s rare for a prominent politician to publicly rethink his position on one of his signature issues. Paul Ryan has just done so.

It is certainly a foundation on which conservatives can build. One of the plan’s proposals would combine 11 current programs — including food stamps, child care, housing subsidies and what remains of traditional welfare — into something called Opportunity Grants. It sounds like a block-grant program, the anathema of liberals because they distrust the states’ ability (or will) to distribute grants fairly, and it comes with a big exception: States can opt in only if their plans pass federal-government muster. more> http://tinyurl.com/l8v5hk4

Why Government Fails, and How to Stop It


By Paul C. Light – 41 important past government failures (between 2001 – 2014) from a search of news stories listed in the Pew Research Center’s “News Interest Index” were identified.

Patterns and characteristics in the dataset of significant government failures:

  • Most of the failures involved errors of omission, not commission
  • Vision with execution is the clear driver of success, just as its absence is an equation for failure
  • The number of government failures has increased over time

more> http://tinyurl.com/q3lhpqk

97 Percent of Key Industries Doubt Security Compliance Can Defy Hackers


(GlebStock/Shutterstock.com )By Aliya Sternstein – Only 3 percent of information technology executives at utilities and other businesses critical to society strongly believe security rules and standards decrease threats to the systems running their operations.

“The regulations themselves are not getting the job done. It’s hard to have regulations in this area that are dynamic enough to be helpful,” Larry Ponemon told Nextgov. more> http://tinyurl.com/orhgyz3

Keeping a city-by-the-sea from becoming a city in it


[ SMARTER CITY ]


By James Sanders and Jesse M. Keenan – Unlike the great capitals of Europe, New York does not sit snugly inland along a winding river. Instead it opens directly onto one of the world’s great oceans, a geographic advantage that helped propel the city to pre-eminence. Even by the 1820s, when Frances Trollope [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] was writing, the city’s proximity to the Atlantic had made it by far the busiest port in the nation.

New York is also Amsterdam — holding back the sea. Since its founding in the early 17th century as New Amsterdam, New York has shared with its namesake the distinctive Dutch instinct to create land by reclaiming it from the sea. more> http://tinyurl.com/mxknxw9

Money Still Fuels the Political Machine


By Megan McArdle – First, the good news: Public campaign funding would probably reduce the influence of “access-oriented interest groups,” which are made up of well-financed power players who use their campaign donations to get the ear of candidates. It would also reduce the bias toward incumbents.

Now, the bad news: That doesn’t necessarily lead to better political outcomes. When the money goes away, the candidates who are elected tend to be more partisan and divided. “Good government” may mean “more extreme government.” more> http://tinyurl.com/nf569d3